A Film about Everything

img_0812Terrence Malick’s latest, “Voyage of Time,” appears to be as ambitious as it sounds, a visual journey from the beginning of time to the end of it, and it could be incredible.  Richard Brody describes Malick’s work most effectively, using satisfying scientific parlance–the interstitial scenes of a broken relationship, occupying a rarefied plane of thought–and he seems to value his work in a way few do.

I agree with Brody in that Malick often gets a prompt dismissal from the viewing public because his work operates outside the day-to-day actions of normal life, or framed stage life; it also dwells in the small moments that Hollywood skips over, the moments that people (who think they know what constitutes art or experience) think don’t make good cinema, and he shoots the overwhelmingly beautiful scenery and sounds around us, be it city or desert, or in the living room or in a raging party.  These invariably inarticulate dismissals of Malick’s films, or other serious works, are particularly tiresome to me, but it’s Friday and I’m in a forgiving mood.

Richard Brody’s New Yorker review of Voyage of Time click here

We can now add to Malick’s scope the space between the microcosm and macrocosm, or at least the pleasant struggle to find the difference.  Voyage of Time seems to nurture that small place of comfort that some of us find in the knowledge that the universe operates completely independent of us– the observers– yet our ability to observe, to recognize beauty, to understand natural processes through curiosity and empirical evidence, is really what defines us and what defines happiness.  The preface of the film seems to try to get at truth (see below). And any film that tries to demonstrate the beauty and significance of a cosmos that is indifferent to us, thorough images that do not exist to be seen by us, is unlikely to engender despair. Rather, (I hope) it reminds us of the deep satisfaction in our desire to contemplate and to understand, to make connections and describe what is beautiful.  This is what I understand to be science, philosophy and art, all in one.

 

A Death in Venice

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A film brimming with sentimentality, gorgeous long shots of an iconic city now lost, and a protagonist who has lost his dignity and health, Luchino Visconti’s Death in Venice also incorporates powerful music from Gustav Mahler, which is wholly moving and at times devastating.  The movie is an adaptation of Thomas Mann’s 1912 novel of the same name. Visconti changed the main character, Gustav, is minor ways that seem to benefit the story-telling of the media of film.  There have been mixed reviews of Visconti’s interpretation, but the film is powerful on its own, and will likely inspire a reading of the novel.

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Death in Venice, novel by German writer Thomas Mann (1921).

Filmed in foggy frames that effectively typify a hot, humid and cholera-ridden Venice, shots are sometimes jaw-dropping; scenes of strolling aristocratic women in flowing white beachwear and holding small umbrellas are reminiscent of a Sorolla painting. The juxtaposition of water and stone, the mackerel sky sunsets, the ornate Grand Hôtel des Bains, Venice once had the power of romantic overload, but a kind of Dionysian overload, connected to the passions and excess of man of which some of us welcome at times, in direct opposition to the structured restraint of  Nietzsche’s Apollo.  Fitting into this ideal at first, Gustav doesn’t seem to notice any beauty at all except for one young man, with whom he steadily becomes obsessed, and we watch his slow, inward disintegration, his panic about aging, and his idealizing erotic beauty at the expense of dignity and intellectual contemplation — Dionysis pursuing Gustav to the end.

The subplot of a cholera epidemic, hidden from public view (it seems even then Venice was concerned about the necessary evil of tourists), brilliantly works into the story of Gustav’s demise.

Grab a bottle of wine and contemplate the Platonic ideal of beauty amongst pragmatism.  For further poignant contrast, compare the cruise ship Venice of today to that of Gustav’s time.

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The Slow Making of a Language

imageOtto Jespersen (1860-1943) was a Danish linguist, and one of the strongest authorities on the English language.  His Growth and Structure of the English Language is a little volume packed full of practical findings about the history of English, yet one gets the feeling that it only scratches the surface of the study, at times even summary and terse.

He demonstrates in some detail the obvious influence of the Normans and the French language on English, so blatant an influence that the reader is left with the impression that our language would be unrecognizable without it.  The obvious contrast between the vernacular of the higher classes (the Normans) and the everyday language of the humbler rural worker (those occupied by the conquest) is interesting enough, but what is striking is the mystery of how the language of the French was spread to those who undoubtedly found it irrelevant to their lives, and how it influences how we speak today.  Vocabulary, verbs and official names not only relating to but directly describing the law, fashion, cuisine, war and military, skilled labor, art and descriptions of leisure activities come from the French in vast quantities. And it was not a matter of one culture merely borrowing terms from another, the Normans introduced these aspects of culture into a native population that lacked them, whatever the level of intention.

The Danes also gave English some of its most important function words, and they influenced modern day English in a different way that is no less fascinating.  English owes less to the Norse tongues than to French in quantity, but possibly more in functionality.  For example, we received the words get, they, them, the, that, this, as well as the suffixes -by, -thorp, -beck, -dale, and -thwaite.  And they really were received, received from an invading force who introduced both a concepts and the words to describe them.

From p. 123:

“It should be noted…that when once a certian pronunciation or signification has been firmly established in a language, the word fulfills its purpose in spite of ever so many might-have-beens, and that, at any rate, correctness in one language should not be measured by the yard of another language.”  

An essential reference for any English speaker with an interest in why we say the words we say.

And I haven’t even finished the Latin and Greek chapters yet…

Science in the Classroom and Beyond

The Internet is saturated with information, some bogus, precious little accurate and useful, and nowhere is this more obvious than in study of science. I value applicable lessons that explain current events in cosmology (among many other things). These are some examples of real efforts to help teachers and amateurs alike to get kids or curious people excited about the incredible natural world beyond.

Lewis Dartnell has a lesson plan to help kids understand how we detect exoplanets.

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http://lewisdartnell.com/en-gb/2016/08/exoplanets-classroom-worksheet/

Click here for NASA’s list of confirmed and documented exoplanets. It is even more interesting using the information in the lesson plans above.

 

Universe Todayimage is a website that I am on all the time. New Horizon’s Pluto discoveries and photos, Curiosity on Mars (and other landers, probes, rovers, spaceships and satellites) ,  SpaceX news, solar system information, deep space, Hubble and Webb telescope news and info…etc..)

 

Phil Plait’s (Twitter: @BadAstronomer) Bad imageAstronomy blog is now on slate.com. Just click on the health & science tab of the website, or this link.

 

imageHeavens Above is one of my favorite astronomy websites because it is full of real useful information that answers those annoying questions I always seem to have. Think you’ve seen a UFO? It was probably an Iridium flash.  Want to track Saturn, ISS, Hubble, Tiangong 1, or a North Korean satellite? Or spacecraft escaping our solar system? It’s here.

Google for Education has chosen some lesson plans from science teachers, almost all of them are great for younger students. A great collection of physics and science lessons related to the movie Interstellar used to be available there, but I’ve been having trouble finding it. I suspect some IP issue there. But check out this list in the meantime.

This Week in Science from the Richard Dawkins Foundation is a periodic collection of articles and news of what’s happening in science today.  Includes much more than cosmology, and always a good read.

And no list like this would be complete without NASA.gov and Space.com. Loads and loads of real information.

Go outside and look up!

The Decline of Violence

imageOf course, every generation is convinced that the world is going to hell, that it was better in the past.  More and more, I am convinced that this is little more than a dismissal of the complexities of the modern world, and I usually take the moaning about the degradation of morals, the disrespect of the youth of today…etc.,  with a grain of salt. In my opinion this is just a form of sentimentalism and nostalgia.  Also, because of the nature of our modern media, we see violence that happens everyday, in places all around the world, and we are less shocked all the time. Some of us are becoming panicked about our jadedness, and we respond in a wide variety of ways–some good for progress, most bad.

I have a feeling, from what I’ve seen and read in my adult life, though, that humanity is growing and evolving away from the widespread violence that has been taken for granted in the near and distant past.  But still, a mere feeling that something is right cannot be defended in any credible way.

I admit I began Steven Pinker’s “The Better Angels of Our Nature” with a bit of confirmation bias because of this feeling.  To look for simple reaffirmation of one’s opinions is irresponsible, but it is another thing to gather proof and information to support a position. Pinker is a scientist who has packed his book with hundreds of citations, graphs, quotes, studies, numbers and overall credibility to put forward in support to his suggestion that violence has declined, overall, in modern history.

From women’s essential part in the civilization of the American West, to daily life in Medieval Europe, from child sacrifice to animal rights, with extensive discussions on modern war and tribalism, and with themes such as rape, child abuse, riot behavior, slavery and war, Pinker shows the sum of today’s incidents of violence is a fraction of what it was in the distant past, and less than in the near past. But it is much more complex than that statement, and it would do us well to figure out those complexities.

From the Steven Pinker website:

“Thanks to the spread of government, literacy, trade, and cosmopolitanism, we increasingly control our impulses, empathize with others, bargain rather than plunder, debunk toxic ideologies, and deploy our powers of reason to reduce the temptations of violence.
With the panache and intellectual zeal that have made his earlier books international bestsellers and literary classics, Pinker will force you to rethink your deepest beliefs about progress, modernity, and human nature. This gripping book is sure to be among the most debated of the century so far.”

The Better Angels of Our Nature: A History of Violence and Humanity    by Steven Pinker

New York, NY: Viking.

Hitchcock and Truffaut Talk Shop

imageAlfred Hitchcock was a living example of what the Cahiers du Cinema thought a director and visionary should be.  I’ve always been surprised by who Godard and Truffaut respected, especially in their early days as burgeoning Nouvelle Vague artists (Howard Hawks, Robert Aldrich…etc.), but they always stressed the importance of the director in the highly collaborative art of cinema.  The documentary Hitchcock Truffaut is probably a lot of what you’ve seen before if you’re a fan of Hitchcock, but watchable nonetheless, and something that can be learned from with each viewing.  There is a reason why Wes Anderson’s copy of Truffaut’s Hitchcock Truffaut is now an overused pile of papers.

Many clips of the documentary are available on YouTube, but the insight of the other directors is worth watching the real documentary. More importantly, though, I believe one should monetarily support works like this.

The New Yorker’s Nathan Heller has written a piece on the book that brought about the documentary (click the first link below).  And Richard Brody wrote a review on the documentary itself (click second link).  Both are excellent, and a fair tributes to the brilliance and dedication of Hitchcock and the humility of Truffaut.

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-book-that-gets-inside-alfred-hitchcocks-mind?mbid=social_facebook

 

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-book-that-reinvented-hitchcock